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Book Review: The Snow by Adam RobertsThe Snow was loaned to me by a science fiction enthusiast, a friend of mine whose favourite author is Adam Roberts. I began this book not knowing anything about it – not even what my friend thought of it because she wouldn’t tell me! – and so I revelled in reading a book where anything could happen. The Snow is set in a truly post-apocalyptic world: “..the snow doesn’t stop. It falls and falls and falls. Until it lies three miles thick across the whole of the earth. Six billion people have died. Perhaps 150,000 survive.” We’re acquainted with Tira, our main character, shortly after the snow starts to fall. It continues and we see her attempt to survive. She keeps contact with family until the phone line goes dead, she obtains tinned food from her deceased neighbour, and abandons her house to acquire shelter and human interaction elsewhere. It seemed to me as if The Snow would follow a typical apocalyptic storyline of human survival and adventure, but it provided a level of depth that I enjoyed and appreciated immensely. The story is told in a scrapbook sort of way, made up of illegal, censored official government documents - mainly Tira’s account of life during the snow, interviews, and government explanations. This added an element of realism to the storyline. It made it feel as if I wasn’t just reading a fictional account but authentic evidence of a cataclysmic event. I thoroughly enjoyed reading about government conspiracies, philosophically and sociologically-referenced rebellions, and even reading about Tira’s personal relationships. The Snow allows the reader to wholly understand how North America reacts to the snowfall, how it affects the nation as a whole as well as its individual citizens. The ending was, to put it bluntly, not to my taste at all, but it didn’t affect my overall enjoyment of the book. The Snow is a wonderfully constructed and developed apocalyptic story; a deceivingly tiny book that has a lot to offer. I’d eagerly suggest it to anyone who loves post-apocalyptic fiction but wants to read outside of what is currently popular. Rating: ★★★★

Book Review: The Snow by Adam Roberts

The Snow was loaned to me by a science fiction enthusiast, a friend of mine whose favourite author is Adam Roberts. I began this book not knowing anything about it – not even what my friend thought of it because she wouldn’t tell me! – and so I revelled in reading a book where anything could happen.

The Snow is set in a truly post-apocalyptic world: “..the snow doesn’t stop. It falls and falls and falls. Until it lies three miles thick across the whole of the earth. Six billion people have died. Perhaps 150,000 survive.” We’re acquainted with Tira, our main character, shortly after the snow starts to fall. It continues and we see her attempt to survive. She keeps contact with family until the phone line goes dead, she obtains tinned food from her deceased neighbour, and abandons her house to acquire shelter and human interaction elsewhere. It seemed to me as if The Snow would follow a typical apocalyptic storyline of human survival and adventure, but it provided a level of depth that I enjoyed and appreciated immensely.

The story is told in a scrapbook sort of way, made up of illegal, censored official government documents - mainly Tira’s account of life during the snow, interviews, and government explanations. This added an element of realism to the storyline. It made it feel as if I wasn’t just reading a fictional account but authentic evidence of a cataclysmic event. I thoroughly enjoyed reading about government conspiracies, philosophically and sociologically-referenced rebellions, and even reading about Tira’s personal relationships. The Snow allows the reader to wholly understand how North America reacts to the snowfall, how it affects the nation as a whole as well as its individual citizens. The ending was, to put it bluntly, not to my taste at all, but it didn’t affect my overall enjoyment of the book.

The Snow is a wonderfully constructed and developed apocalyptic story; a deceivingly tiny book that has a lot to offer. I’d eagerly suggest it to anyone who loves post-apocalyptic fiction but wants to read outside of what is currently popular.

Rating: ★★★★


Notes

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    Going to have to look into reading this book.
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