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Review: Immortal Beloved by Cate Tiernan (young-adult, fantasy)Synopsis:Nastasya has spent the  last century living as a spoiled, drugged-out party girl. She feels  nothing and cares for no one. But when she witnesses her best friend, a  Dark Immortal, torture a human, she realizes something’s got to change.  She seeks refuge at a rehab for wayward immortals, where she meets the  gorgeous, undeniably sexy Reyn, who seems inexplicably linked to her  past. 
Nastasya finally begins to deal with life, and even feels safe—until the night she learns that someone wants her dead.
Cate  Tiernan, author of the popular Sweep series, returns with an engaging  story of a timeless struggle and inescapable romance, the first book in a  stunning new fantasy trilogy. Read more…Review:When I first heard that Cate Tiernan was releasing a new book, I was elated. It had been about eight years since I first picked up Book of Shadows and I have been a supporter of her ever since. However, I was apprehensive when I saw that it was described as “paranormal” and “urban fantasy”. Paranormal romance is hugely popular at the moment. Lets face it, it’s everywhere. The book also has the generic black and red cover design that is clearly marketed at a certain kind of readership - a readership that I felt I no longer belonged to, which is why it has taken me four months to pick up the book.Secondly, Book of Shadows was published in 2001 - 10 years ago, and things have changed dramatically since then. I was therefore apprehensive about what her writing style and imagination would be like 10 years on. I had grown up, but had I outgrown her work? Thankfully, Immortal Beloved did not disappoint. We’re immediately confronted with Nastasya aka “Nasty” - a confident, blunt, self-assured and at times, hilarious, young girl (although, I have to admit, I can’t stand her name), who runs away from the friends she has known for so long once they cause a man to be paralysed and leave him lying in the street. Nastasya heads for Immortal rehab where she aims to overcome her depression and sort out her life. She meets some interesting, mysterious characters with stories of their own, such as Reyn, a beautiful but hostile Dutch boy. What I enjoyed about this book was that Cate Tiernan manages to create a current storyline whilst staying true to what she knows and what she is good at. She injects familiar notions into the storyline: circles, sigils, rules, spells, and scrying, whilst still managing to make it modern and relevant. Reading this book was like curling up with a cup of hot chocolate in front of the fire on a cold winter night - familiar and comforting. The historical flashbacks add intrigue to the story as we try to figure out how they all piece together; what do they mean?Tiernan is also unafraid of being understated. Current fantasy novels tend to rely on action and cliffhangers to draw their audience in, such as City of Bones, whereas Tiernan mainly relies on a good storyline. I was very happy with this book and will definitely carry on reading the trilogy. Cate Tiernan is back!Thank you Hodder for sending me the book to review!My Rating: 4/5Goodreads Average Rating: 4/529 / 50 books read for 50 Book Challenge #3.

Review: Immortal Beloved by Cate Tiernan (young-adult, fantasy)

Synopsis:
Nastasya has spent the last century living as a spoiled, drugged-out party girl. She feels nothing and cares for no one. But when she witnesses her best friend, a Dark Immortal, torture a human, she realizes something’s got to change. She seeks refuge at a rehab for wayward immortals, where she meets the gorgeous, undeniably sexy Reyn, who seems inexplicably linked to her past.

Nastasya finally begins to deal with life, and even feels safe—until the night she learns that someone wants her dead.

Cate Tiernan, author of the popular Sweep series, returns with an engaging story of a timeless struggle and inescapable romance, the first book in a stunning new fantasy trilogy. Read more…

Review:
When I first heard that Cate Tiernan was releasing a new book, I was elated. It had been about eight years since I first picked up Book of Shadows and I have been a supporter of her ever since. However, I was apprehensive when I saw that it was described as “paranormal” and “urban fantasy”. Paranormal romance is hugely popular at the moment. Lets face it, it’s everywhere. The book also has the generic black and red cover design that is clearly marketed at a certain kind of readership - a readership that I felt I no longer belonged to, which is why it has taken me four months to pick up the book.

Secondly, Book of Shadows was published in 2001 - 10 years ago, and things have changed dramatically since then. I was therefore apprehensive about what her writing style and imagination would be like 10 years on. I had grown up, but had I outgrown her work?

Thankfully, Immortal Beloved did not disappoint. We’re immediately confronted with Nastasya aka “Nasty” - a confident, blunt, self-assured and at times, hilarious, young girl (although, I have to admit, I can’t stand her name), who runs away from the friends she has known for so long once they cause a man to be paralysed and leave him lying in the street. Nastasya heads for Immortal rehab where she aims to overcome her depression and sort out her life. She meets some interesting, mysterious characters with stories of their own, such as Reyn, a beautiful but hostile Dutch boy.

What I enjoyed about this book was that Cate Tiernan manages to create a current storyline whilst staying true to what she knows and what she is good at. She injects familiar notions into the storyline: circles, sigils, rules, spells, and scrying, whilst still managing to make it modern and relevant. Reading this book was like curling up with a cup of hot chocolate in front of the fire on a cold winter night - familiar and comforting. The historical flashbacks add intrigue to the story as we try to figure out how they all piece together; what do they mean?

Tiernan is also unafraid of being understated. Current fantasy novels tend to rely on action and cliffhangers to draw their audience in, such as City of Bones, whereas Tiernan mainly relies on a good storyline.

I was very happy with this book and will definitely carry on reading the trilogy. Cate Tiernan is back!

Thank you Hodder for sending me the book to review!

My Rating: 4/5
Goodreads Average Rating: 4/5
29 / 50 books read for 50 Book Challenge #3.

Read the first chapter of Patrick Ness’s new book, A Monster Calls, over at Guardian Books.Synposis:The monster showed up  just after midnight. As they do. But it isn’t the monster Conor’s been  expecting. He’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the one he’s  had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments, the one  with the darkness and the wind and the screaming… The monster in his  back garden, though, this monster is something different. Something  ancient, something wild. And it wants the most dangerous thing of all  from Conor. It wants the truth.

Read the first chapter of Patrick Ness’s new book, A Monster Calls, over at Guardian Books.

Synposis:
The monster showed up just after midnight. As they do. But it isn’t the monster Conor’s been expecting. He’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the one he’s had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments, the one with the darkness and the wind and the screaming… The monster in his back garden, though, this monster is something different. Something ancient, something wild. And it wants the most dangerous thing of all from Conor. It wants the truth.

  • Guardian
Recommended To Me: The Violets of March by Sarah Jio (romance, historical fiction, mystery)

A heartbroken woman stumbled upon a diary and steps into the life of its anonymous author. 
In her twenties, Emily Wilson was on top of the world: she had a  bestselling novel, a husband plucked from the pages of GQ, and a one-way  ticket to happily ever after. 
Ten  years later, the tide has turned on Emily’s good fortune. So  when her  great-aunt Bee invites her to spend the month of March on  Bainbridge  Island in Washington State, Emily accepts, longing to be  healed by the  sea. Researching her next book, Emily discovers a red  velvet diary,  dated 1943, whose contents reveal startling connections  to her own life. 
A mesmerizing debut with an idyllic setting and intriguing dual  story line, The Violets of March announces Sarah Jio as a writer to  watch.


I came across this title yesterday. It looks like just the sort of adult fiction I want to read right now… I’m trying to decide whether it’s worth getting even though I already have 115 books in my “to read” pile (it’s ridiculous and unjustifiable, I know).But it looks so goood, and so pretty, and so summery…

Recommended To Me: The Violets of March by Sarah Jio (romance, historical fiction, mystery)

A heartbroken woman stumbled upon a diary and steps into the life of its anonymous author.

In her twenties, Emily Wilson was on top of the world: she had a bestselling novel, a husband plucked from the pages of GQ, and a one-way ticket to happily ever after.

Ten years later, the tide has turned on Emily’s good fortune. So when her great-aunt Bee invites her to spend the month of March on Bainbridge Island in Washington State, Emily accepts, longing to be healed by the sea. Researching her next book, Emily discovers a red velvet diary, dated 1943, whose contents reveal startling connections to her own life.

A mesmerizing debut with an idyllic setting and intriguing dual story line, The Violets of March announces Sarah Jio as a writer to watch.

I came across this title yesterday. It looks like just the sort of adult fiction I want to read right now… I’m trying to decide whether it’s worth getting even though I already have 115 books in my “to read” pile (it’s ridiculous and unjustifiable, I know).

But it looks so goood, and so pretty, and so summery…

5 Myths About the 'Information Age'

bibliofeminista:

1. “The book is dead.” Wrong: More books are produced in print each year than in the previous year. One million new titles will appear worldwide in 2011. In one day in Britain—”Super Thursday,” last October 1—800 new works were published. The latest figures for the United States cover only 2009, and they do not distinguish between new books and new editions of old books. But the total number, 288,355, suggests a healthy market, and the growth in 2010 and 2011 is likely to be much greater. Moreover, these figures, furnished by Bowker, do not include the explosion in the output of “nontraditional” books—a further 764,448 titles produced by self-publishing authors and “micro-niche” print-on-demand enterprises. And the book business is booming in developing countries like China and Brazil. However it is measured, the population of books is increasing, not decreasing, and certainly not dying.

Read more…