prettybooks

Review: The Flipback Reading Experience

If you don’t know about it already, the flipback is another completely new reading experience. It’s a print book that’s the size of an iPhone yet it’s a hardback with the weight of an ereader. You can find out more information and view a video about flipbacks at www.flipbackbooks.com.

I first heard about flipbacks a few months ago when I thought everyone was talking about some sort of new ereader. It hadn’t occurred to me that anyone would create a new print book format. But here it is.

It’s amazing just how small the flipback is. It takes up hardly any space in my bag and it’s lighter than the average paperback. Imagine how many of these you could fit on a bookshelf – my storage problems would be solved! I wouldn’t necessarily have had to buy an ereader. Now, this is also an extremely girly thing to say, but they’re also so cute. I obviously care about book aesthetics considering I’m running this blog, and I love the look of these. It’s strange holding a miniature book in your hands.

Of course, the most important thing is the reading experience. At first, I felt like I had to be really careful with this fragile little thing because of how thin the paper is (think: the Bible). I also had to fight the uncontrollable urge to turn the book the ‘right way around’ - you lift the pages up as opposed to across. However, after a while, I found it just as comfortable as using my Kindle – you can easily hold the book with one hand, which I sometimes find difficult if I’m holding a heavy paperback. Flipbacks are small but the text is still comfortably readable. Although, of course, you still have to turn the page with your other hand – there’s no button here to do that for you!

Overall, I love how small and portable flipbacks are but I’m not sure how exciting I’ll find them after the novelty has worn off. They’re priced at £9.99, which is higher than the full price of a paperback. I’m still going to buy a few – One Day by David Nicholls, Shades of Gray by Jasper Fforde, and Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell. I think they’re great for anyone who’s running out of space, or who travels a lot, but refuses to join the digital ereading experience.

Flipbacks will be available from 30th June in the UK but US publishers have yet to be inspired.
Thank you Hodder for sending me the flipback to review!

Review: The Flipback Reading Experience

If you don’t know about it already, the flipback is another completely new reading experience. It’s a print book that’s the size of an iPhone yet it’s a hardback with the weight of an ereader. You can find out more information and view a video about flipbacks at www.flipbackbooks.com.

I first heard about flipbacks a few months ago when I thought everyone was talking about some sort of new ereader. It hadn’t occurred to me that anyone would create a new print book format. But here it is.

It’s amazing just how small the flipback is. It takes up hardly any space in my bag and it’s lighter than the average paperback. Imagine how many of these you could fit on a bookshelf – my storage problems would be solved! I wouldn’t necessarily have had to buy an ereader. Now, this is also an extremely girly thing to say, but they’re also so cute. I obviously care about book aesthetics considering I’m running this blog, and I love the look of these. It’s strange holding a miniature book in your hands.

Of course, the most important thing is the reading experience. At first, I felt like I had to be really careful with this fragile little thing because of how thin the paper is (think: the Bible). I also had to fight the uncontrollable urge to turn the book the ‘right way around’ - you lift the pages up as opposed to across. However, after a while, I found it just as comfortable as using my Kindle – you can easily hold the book with one hand, which I sometimes find difficult if I’m holding a heavy paperback. Flipbacks are small but the text is still comfortably readable. Although, of course, you still have to turn the page with your other hand – there’s no button here to do that for you!

Overall, I love how small and portable flipbacks are but I’m not sure how exciting I’ll find them after the novelty has worn off. They’re priced at £9.99, which is higher than the full price of a paperback. I’m still going to buy a few – One Day by David Nicholls, Shades of Gray by Jasper Fforde, and Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell. I think they’re great for anyone who’s running out of space, or who travels a lot, but refuses to join the digital ereading experience.

Flipbacks will be available from 30th June in the UK but US publishers have yet to be inspired.

Thank you Hodder for sending me the flipback to review!

Fernando French: One Book, One Tumblr

fernandofrench:

Everyone is doing it. Seattleites started the trend in 1998 and Chicagoans followed suit a few years later. It wasn’t long before the idea trickled through to other cities and they started doing it.

Then, a writer from Wired wondered: what if, instead of being bounded by the limits of a physical place, people on the Internet did it? So he chose Twitter and, together with its denizens, made new what was old by creating “One Book, One Twitter,” a massively online book club in which everyone on Twitter read and talked about the same book. It was such a success they’re doing it again this year.

And that’s when I began to think, why isn’t there a “One Book, One Tumblr” project? Tumblr is large enough that at least one or two (thousand) of us like to read, right? If my research is correct – and it probably is because I Googled with quotes – a Tumblr equivalent of “One Book, One Twitter” does not yet exist. So here goes:

Official nominations for the first annual “One Book, One Tumblr” begin today, May 31, 2011. Book nominations will end June 6, after which voting begins to select the final title. But because there will potentially be hundreds of suggestions, it would be better if we pared it down to fewer choices. And to do that, I will enlist the folks in the Books and Writers Spotlight to pick the final 5 titles. After all the votes are tabulated, the official title will be announced June 13. And then we can begin reading and discussing. Hate it? Love it? Tag your posts with #onebookonetumblrand we’ll see what happens.

But for now, we need ideas, so reblog this with your book suggestions. Please keep it to books in English and by authors who are still alive because, well, every project needs a few ground rules.