prettybooks

hey !

so i had the opportunity to read Before I Fall and then Delirium ! Shockingly, I found myself loving Delirium soo much and its such an amazing book better than Before I Fall ! the only thing is that as you mentioned before , its similar to Matched and the Hunger Games (although I had not read Matched). but i also found it similar to the Uglies. dont you think so ? btw , will there be a second book coming out ? :)

Asked by languorouslullaby

Hiya! I’m glad you found Delirium to be a pleasant surprise. It’s one of my favourite books so far this year. It is very different to Before I Fall, but I liked them both in their own way. The second book, Pandemonium, will be out in February 2012. I wish we didn’t have to wait so long! There will also be a third book, Requiem, to be released in February 2013.

I have heard many people say it’s similar to Uglies but it has been such a long time since I read it (around 6 years) that I can’t remember much. I really want to reread it again since I never finished the series. Delirium only reminded me of Matched and The Hunger Games because they were the only other YA dystopia books I had read recently. 

Review: The Ask and the Answer by Patrick Ness (young-adult, science fiction, dystopia)Synopsis:We were in the square,  in the square where I’d run, holding her, carrying her, telling her to  stay alive, stay alive till we got safe, till we got to Haven so I could  save her - But there weren’t no safety, no safety at all, there was  just him and his men. Fleeing before a relentless army, Todd has carried  a desperately wounded Viola right into the hands of their worst enemy,  Mayor Prentiss. Read more… Review:NOTE: This review may contain spoilers.The Ask and the Answer the thrilling sequel to The Knife of Never Letting Go. It covers extremely vital and realistic themes, which I wasn’t expecting. There are themes of power, loyalty, oppression, war, segregation, sexism, resistance, manipulation and genocide. There is so much packed into this sequel, all hugely powerful and harrowing themes to explore in young-adult literature - and who says it has no substance? No worth?I actually enjoyed - if that’s the right word - this book more than the first because of how truthful it was. The reader feels like they’re actually in New Prentisstown. The reader does not know who to trust, which action to take. We’re perplexed, bemused amongst the chaos and manipulation. We suffer with Todd, yet feel like we shouldn’t feel sympathy. The way the indigenous population, the Spackle (or the “Spacks”, the slur they are called by their captors), is treated is reminiscent of the forced labour camps and genocide in WW2. In a way, Todd is no different from the Soviet guards in control of the forced labour camps that held Baltic prisoners.  The Spackle are tortured, treated as animals and forced to work to perpetuate their own slavery (this reminded me of how the Baltic peoples in the Arctic were forced to build their own settlements to protect them from the cold, even though it was a futile task). The Spackle, and the women, are permanently branded like livestock. Removing the mental branding will mean they’ll slowly bleed to death. Todd is essentially a reluctant Soviet guard, slowly becoming one of those he fought against, adopting the same mentality. Can he be brought back?Meanwhile, war is brewing on both sides. In New Prentisstown, there are relentless, unfeeling men following the President Prentiss’s commands, whilst the women, breaking out of gender stereotypes imposed on them, are on the outskirts creating their own army. Both commit inhumane, implausible acts, which raise questions such as: Can peace be achieved without violence? Is it justifiable to kill a small minority to protect the majority?  This book is just as fast-paced and action-packed as the previous. It reminds us that psychological control is just as effective, if not more effective, than physical control. It is a highlight in young-adult fiction, showing us that it is able to raise powerful discussions about ethics and history. I can’t say I am looking forward to Monsters of Men. I can feel a war forthcoming.My Rating: ★★★★Goodreads Average Rating: ★★★★34/50 books read for 50 Book Challenge #3

Review: The Ask and the Answer by Patrick Ness (young-adult, science fiction, dystopia)

Synopsis:
We were in the square, in the square where I’d run, holding her, carrying her, telling her to stay alive, stay alive till we got safe, till we got to Haven so I could save her - But there weren’t no safety, no safety at all, there was just him and his men. Fleeing before a relentless army, Todd has carried a desperately wounded Viola right into the hands of their worst enemy, Mayor Prentiss. Read more…

Review:
NOTE: This review may contain spoilers.
The Ask and the Answer the thrilling sequel to The Knife of Never Letting Go. It covers extremely vital and realistic themes, which I wasn’t expecting. There are themes of power, loyalty, oppression, war, segregation, sexism, resistance, manipulation and genocide. There is so much packed into this sequel, all hugely powerful and harrowing themes to explore in young-adult literature - and who says it has no substance? No worth?

I actually enjoyed - if that’s the right word - this book more than the first because of how truthful it was. The reader feels like they’re actually in New Prentisstown. The reader does not know who to trust, which action to take. We’re perplexed, bemused amongst the chaos and manipulation. We suffer with Todd, yet feel like we shouldn’t feel sympathy. The way the indigenous population, the Spackle (or the “Spacks”, the slur they are called by their captors), is treated is reminiscent of the forced labour camps and genocide in WW2. In a way, Todd is no different from the Soviet guards in control of the forced labour camps that held Baltic prisoners.  The Spackle are tortured, treated as animals and forced to work to perpetuate their own slavery (this reminded me of how the Baltic peoples in the Arctic were forced to build their own settlements to protect them from the cold, even though it was a futile task). The Spackle, and the women, are permanently branded like livestock. Removing the mental branding will mean they’ll slowly bleed to death. Todd is essentially a reluctant Soviet guard, slowly becoming one of those he fought against, adopting the same mentality. Can he be brought back?

Meanwhile, war is brewing on both sides. In New Prentisstown, there are relentless, unfeeling men following the President Prentiss’s commands, whilst the women, breaking out of gender stereotypes imposed on them, are on the outskirts creating their own army. Both commit inhumane, implausible acts, which raise questions such as: Can peace be achieved without violence? Is it justifiable to kill a small minority to protect the majority? 

This book is just as fast-paced and action-packed as the previous. It reminds us that psychological control is just as effective, if not more effective, than physical control. It is a highlight in young-adult fiction, showing us that it is able to raise powerful discussions about ethics and history.

I can’t say I am looking forward to Monsters of Men. I can feel a war forthcoming.

My Rating: ★★★★
Goodreads Average Rating: ★★★★
34/50 books read for 50 Book Challenge #3

Review: It’s Not Summer Without You by Jenny Han (young-adult, romance, realistic fiction)Synopsis:Last  year, all of  Belly’s dreams came true and the thought of missing a  summer in Cousins  Beach was inconceivable. But like the rise and fall  of the ocean tide,  things can change—  just like that. Suddenly the  time she’s always  looked forward to most is something she dreads. And  when Jeremiah calls  to say Conrad has disappeared, Belly must decide  how she will spend this  summer: chasing after the boy she loves, or  finally letting him go. Read more…Review:It’s Not Summer Without You is the second book in the Summer trilogy. This book alternates between  both Belly and Jeremiah’s viewpoints, which  I really enjoyed. It was  interesting to see different points of view on  the same situation:  Conrad has disappeared from college and so both  characters set off to  find him and bring him back home. This book is a  lot darker than the  previous. We see how each character deals with  devastating events -  love and loss, but it still manages to retain its summery feel. It  made  me appreciate Conrad a little more but I still think he can be incredibly rude and frustrating (and so I still prefer Jeremiah!). I  gave this book 3.5/5 because while I still liked, I didn’t enjoy  it as  much as the previous book. I had assumed that some things would be   resolved and that Belly would have grown up and become more mature,   since a year had passed, but she’s still the same old self-centered   Belly that we’ve come to know and love. Even though I knew how   stupid and immature Belly’s was acting, I still understood why she  acted  the way she did and said things she said. Any relationship -  romantic,  friendship, familial, can be extremely hard and it’s almost  impossible  to get it right all the time. The book ends on one hell of a epilogue. It’s extremely short, vague and leaves me thinking "Does this mean what I think it means?" The next book, We’ll Always Have Summer, should be extremely interesting… I’m only disappointed that I need to wait so long for it to be released in the UK. "I  will never look at you in the same way ever again. I’ll never  be that  girl again. The girl who comes running back every time you push  her  away, the girl who loves you anyway." Thank you Penguin for sending me the book to review.My Rating: 3.5/5Goodreads Average Rating: ★★★★33/50 books read for 50 Book Challenge #3

Review: It’s Not Summer Without You by Jenny Han (young-adult, romance, realistic fiction)

Synopsis:
Last year, all of Belly’s dreams came true and the thought of missing a summer in Cousins Beach was inconceivable. But like the rise and fall of the ocean tide, things can change— just like that. Suddenly the time she’s always looked forward to most is something she dreads. And when Jeremiah calls to say Conrad has disappeared, Belly must decide how she will spend this summer: chasing after the boy she loves, or finally letting him go. Read more…

Review:
It’s Not Summer Without You is the second book in the Summer trilogy. This book alternates between both Belly and Jeremiah’s viewpoints, which I really enjoyed. It was interesting to see different points of view on the same situation: Conrad has disappeared from college and so both characters set off to find him and bring him back home. This book is a lot darker than the previous. We see how each character deals with devastating events - love and loss, but it still manages to retain its summery feel. It made me appreciate Conrad a little more but I still think he can be incredibly rude and frustrating (and so I still prefer Jeremiah!).

I gave this book 3.5/5 because while I still liked, I didn’t enjoy it as much as the previous book. I had assumed that some things would be resolved and that Belly would have grown up and become more mature, since a year had passed, but she’s still the same old self-centered Belly that we’ve come to know and love. Even though I knew how stupid and immature Belly’s was acting, I still understood why she acted the way she did and said things she said. Any relationship - romantic, friendship, familial, can be extremely hard and it’s almost impossible to get it right all the time.

The book ends on one hell of a epilogue. It’s extremely short, vague and leaves me thinking "Does this mean what I think it means?" The next book, We’ll Always Have Summer, should be extremely interesting… I’m only disappointed that I need to wait so long for it to be released in the UK.

"I will never look at you in the same way ever again. I’ll never be that girl again. The girl who comes running back every time you push her away, the girl who loves you anyway."

Thank you Penguin for sending me the book to review.

My Rating:
3.5/5
Goodreads Average Rating: ★★★★
33/50 books read for 50 Book Challenge #3